Thinking about twenty-ten

January 7, 2010

neverspeak2009

In 2009, I did not have to search for food, go to war, or otherwise suffer or sacrifice as so many did. I did not have to look for work and I’m feeling pretty lucky to have a good job right now with great co-workers and thousands of connections with some of the best minds in the business. So, my “problems” are way, way insignificant but, they provide opportunities for making things even  better in 2010.

Suffice to say that looking back on 2009, I’m not chomping at the bit to re-live it.  It was much too chaotic for me and I’m not really the type that has to have everything in place. So it was big time CHAOTIC for a person OK with moderate chaos. Everything in moderation…chaos included.

The ASTD Big Question this month offers a nice opportunity to reflect, plan and predict.
big-question.gif
Responses are to be made around three questions:

  1. What are your biggest challenges for this upcoming year?
  2. What are your major plans for the year?
  3. What predictions do you have for the year?

I’ll get the prediction out of the way first. Here’s the one I wrote for the popular eLearn annual prediction article. I was limited to 100 words. In a word: complexity.

We will see more “platform as a service” (PaaS) solutions with further computing enhancements to support the “micro” movement. Aggregators, mobile support, and real-time collaboration will bring a new level of complexity to the increasingly distributed, knowledge-driven workplace. As we process more fragmented information and sources, content curators will be needed to support transfer of learning. Tight budgets and renewed fear of travel will bring more innovative blended learning solutions that include online presence support, 3-D immersive environments, and gaming solutions. “Rogue” will give way to acceptance as companies reconcile the privacy and productivity concerns associated with social media. As a result, we’ll see the formation of richer online networks and communities. On the horizon…augmented reality.

Now for the other two questions…

Biggest challenges for this upcoming year:

  • Balance
  • Control
  • Discipline

Major plans for the year:

  • Speak at some conferences
  • Separate social media marketing stuff and the e-learning stuff
  • Take two courses
  • Take two family vacations
  • Get digital assistant
  • Embrace chaos, kick CHAOS in the shin

Now I need to put this into action.

  • https://blogs.wharton.upenn.edu/staff/remurphy/ Erin

    Embracing chaos might be one of the most important things we could all learn!! 🙂 I like your prediction, I think it summarizes some important issues that we will have to make decisions about in the upcoming years to follow.

  • https://blogs.wharton.upenn.edu/staff/remurphy/ Erin

    Embracing chaos might be one of the most important things we could all learn!! 🙂 I like your prediction, I think it summarizes some important issues that we will have to make decisions about in the upcoming years to follow.

  • Suzanne

    Ahhh…how to surf/navigate chaos and complexity? I've always got my senses open for useful metaphors that can help un-tense my reactions to chaos and complexity. I can somehow live with the ambiguities of complexities, but when chaos comes along for the ride, I'm apt to snub him. I too am a moderate around chaos. One of my recent interests is in minimalist thinkers (bloggers/tweeters, etc.). They bring me back to a time when, I was (well comparatively speaking I still am) very content with very little. The challenge now though is to still stay connected, but with a minimalist orientation. I also just revisited a wonderful book of light-hearted, insightful prose, The Book of Qualities by Ruth Gendler.

  • Suzanne

    Ahhh…how to surf/navigate chaos and complexity? I've always got my senses open for useful metaphors that can help un-tense my reactions to chaos and complexity. I can somehow live with the ambiguities of complexities, but when chaos comes along for the ride, I'm apt to snub him. I too am a moderate around chaos. One of my recent interests is in minimalist thinkers (bloggers/tweeters, etc.). They bring me back to a time when, I was (well comparatively speaking I still am) very content with very little. The challenge now though is to still stay connected, but with a minimalist orientation.

    I also just revisited a wonderful book of light-hearted, insightful prose, The Book of Qualities by Ruth Gendler.

  • http://brandon-hall.com/janetclarey jclarey

    Suzanne – thanks for bringing up minimalists. I'm not sure I could do what you're setting out to do – “stay connected, but with minimalist orientation” because (right now) I can't even visualize was stripped down connectedness looks like. I suppose I could limit the number of “pieces” that serve as the gateway to my various conversations. I can across this post (http://www.designsojourn.com/minimalism-simplic…) from Brian Ling where he brings up simplexity…”an emerging theory that proposes a possible complementary relationship between complexity and simplicity” (Wikipedia definition). There's a lot there. Thanks for the book recommendation.

  • http://brandon-hall.com/janetclarey jclarey

    Suzanne – thanks for bringing up minimalists. I'm not sure I could do what you're setting out to do – “stay connected, but with minimalist orientation” because (right now) I can't even visualize was stripped down connectedness looks like. I suppose I could limit the number of “pieces” that serve as the gateway to my various conversations.

    I can across this post (http://www.designsojourn.com/minimalism-simplic…) from Brian Ling where he brings up simplexity…”an emerging theory that proposes a possible complementary relationship between complexity and simplicity” (Wikipedia definition). There's a lot there.

    Thanks for the book recommendation.

  • http://brandon-hall.com/janetclarey jclarey

    Thanks Erin. I'm not sure that it covers any new ground but it sums up what I've been seeing. Who knows with these things? It's limited to knowledge workers too. I seem to be firmly entrenched in that area lately so it's not really 'big picture' enough for our industry.

  • http://brandon-hall.com/janetclarey jclarey

    Thanks Erin. I'm not sure that it covers any new ground but it sums up what I've been seeing. Who knows with these things? It's limited to knowledge workers too. I seem to be firmly entrenched in that area lately so it's not really 'big picture' enough for our industry.

  • mwiseman

    Hello Janet, I really felt your predictions are spot-on for 2010. When you mentioned further computing enhancements to support the “micro” movement, aggregators, mobile support, and real-time collaboration as bringing a new level of complexity to the increasingly distributed, knowledge-driven workplace, I shouted to myself, 'yes!' I was wondering if you might expand and share your thoughts concerning: content curators who will be needed to support transfer of learning? This sounds so intriguing.

  • mwiseman

    Hello Janet, I really felt your predictions are spot-on for 2010. When you mentioned further computing enhancements to support the “micro” movement, aggregators, mobile support, and real-time collaboration as bringing a new level of complexity to the increasingly distributed, knowledge-driven workplace, I shouted to myself, 'yes!'

    I was wondering if you might expand and share your thoughts concerning:
    content curators who will be needed to support transfer of learning? This sounds so intriguing.

  • http://brandon-hall.com/janetclarey jclarey

    Thanks! I'm working on a post about content curators. Too much to write here. I've run across a few new things today and book marked them. Stay tuned (and thanks for your comment).

  • http://brandon-hall.com/janetclarey jclarey

    Thanks! I'm working on a post about content curators. Too much to write here. I've run across a few new things today and book marked them. Stay tuned (and thanks for your comment).

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