Googley design

May 26, 2009

Googley design…worth thinking about in the context of instructional design.

  1. Focus on people—their lives, their work, their dreams.
  2. Every millisecond counts.
  3. Simplicity is powerful.
  4. Engage beginners and attract experts.
  5. Dare to innovate.
  6. Design for the world.
  7. Plan for today’s and tomorrow’s business.
  8. Delight the eye without distracting the mind.
  9. Be worthy of people’s trust.
  10. Add a human touch.

The principle flows from Google’s Corporate Philosophy
“Ten things Google has found to be true:”

  1. Focus on the user and all else will follow.
  2. It’s best to do one thing really, really well.
  3. Fast is better than slow.
  4. Democracy on the web works.
  5. You don’t need to be at your desk to need an answer.
  6. You can make money without doing evil.
  7. There’s always more information out there.
  8. The need for information crosses all borders.
  9. You can be serious without a suit.
  10. Great just isn’t good enough.

Applied to Instructional Design, and corporate learning in general, these lists seem to be a pretty good jumping off point.

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  • http://james.wanless.info/ James

    Janet, I think there’s actually too much separation between the notion of Instructional Design and other types of User Centred Design.

    Sure, the activities, pacing, step size and other elements of ID are different in many ways to, say, building an ecommerce flow for an application, or a search engine.

    However, what I see as I trundle through my current MA program with the Moodle implementation we use, or in my own institution’s use of D2L, is that there is not nearly enough ‘experience design principles’ or UCD principles applied to the web approach to distance learning.

    While pedagogy and epistemology are important things for an ID professional to understand, that most web designers don’t have to contend with, I think many online and distance learning artifacts and courses/programs would be much, much better, if educational institutions had more basic web design expertise on their teams for things like LMS or course interface design.

    I’ll save the rant about LMS versus the point you’ve included above on web democracy for another time. Most LMS’s don’t allow people to define their own experience or make the work they’re doing more open for informal learning and feedback from a broader audience.

  • http://james.wanless.info James

    Janet, I think there’s actually too much separation between the notion of Instructional Design and other types of User Centred Design.

    Sure, the activities, pacing, step size and other elements of ID are different in many ways to, say, building an ecommerce flow for an application, or a search engine.

    However, what I see as I trundle through my current MA program with the Moodle implementation we use, or in my own institution’s use of D2L, is that there is not nearly enough ‘experience design principles’ or UCD principles applied to the web approach to distance learning.

    While pedagogy and epistemology are important things for an ID professional to understand, that most web designers don’t have to contend with, I think many online and distance learning artifacts and courses/programs would be much, much better, if educational institutions had more basic web design expertise on their teams for things like LMS or course interface design.

    I’ll save the rant about LMS versus the point you’ve included above on web democracy for another time. Most LMS’s don’t allow people to define their own experience or make the work they’re doing more open for informal learning and feedback from a broader audience.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    I totally agree with you. I felt the same way during my MA program and more so now in my PhD program. There seems to be a “not our job” mentality. Thanks for saving the rant about LMS & democracy…although that’ll be a fun one to talk about.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    I totally agree with you. I felt the same way during my MA program and more so now in my PhD program. There seems to be a “not our job” mentality. Thanks for saving the rant about LMS & democracy…although that’ll be a fun one to talk about.

  • http://onlinesapiens.com/ Eduardo Peirano

    – Every millisecond counts.
    – Simplicity is powerful.

    It apply to bloated websites, blogs, and Nings

  • http://onlinesapiens.com Eduardo Peirano

    – Every millisecond counts.
    – Simplicity is powerful.

    It apply to bloated websites, blogs, and Nings

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Absolutely Eduardo

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Absolutely Eduardo

  • http://syberworks.com/ Dina

    Great points, Janet! This article presents some interesting points about instructional design techniques as well: “10 Instructional Design Tips for e-Learning Development.” It’s located at http://syberworks.com/articles/10-instructional-design-tips.htm. Check it out!

    Dinas last blog post..#26 – Interview with Brooke White, Training Manager for LANDesk Software, Incorporated

  • http://syberworks.com/ Dina

    Great points, Janet! This article presents some interesting points about instructional design techniques as well: “10 Instructional Design Tips for e-Learning Development.” It’s located at http://syberworks.com/articles/10-instructional-design-tips.htm. Check it out!

    Dinas last blog post..#26 – Interview with Brooke White, Training Manager for LANDesk Software, Incorporated

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Thanks for the link Dina.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Thanks for the link Dina.

  • http://learnometrics.blogspot.com/ Umesh Bisht

    2. It’s best to do one thing really, really well.

    Not sure if I agree with this. Acquiring multiple skills along with multi-tasking has become quite important for instructional designers.

    Nice post!

    Umesh Bishts last blog post..KIPP

  • http://learnometrics.blogspot.com Umesh Bisht

    2. It’s best to do one thing really, really well.

    Not sure if I agree with this. Acquiring multiple skills along with multi-tasking has become quite important for instructional designers.

    Nice post!

    Umesh Bishts last blog post..KIPP

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    I don’t think that statement means we should not acquire multiple skills and I don’t think it has anything to do with multi-tasking. If you read it simply, it just means you should do one thing really, really well. (i.e., Google and what it does for the world’s information).

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    I don’t think that statement means we should not acquire multiple skills and I don’t think it has anything to do with multi-tasking. If you read it simply, it just means you should do one thing really, really well. (i.e., Google and what it does for the world’s information).

  • http://learnometrics.blogspot.com/ Umesh Bisht

    I was reading it in the context of ID as you’d suggested. Oh okay! we were just discussing Google’s Corporate Philosophy in your “learning” blog! I see it now. Thanks.

    Umesh Bishts last blog post..KIPP

  • http://learnometrics.blogspot.com Umesh Bisht

    I was reading it in the context of ID as you’d suggested. Oh okay! we were just discussing Google’s Corporate Philosophy in your “learning” blog! I see it now. Thanks.

    Umesh Bishts last blog post..KIPP

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Chill : )

    Still, if I look at Google’s idea of doing one thing good (managing the world’s information) in the context of ID, I see the ‘one thing’ philosophy (creating effective learning experience)..instead of doing multiple other things that might get in the way of that (things that don’t require an instructional solution).

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Chill : )

    Still, if I look at Google’s idea of doing one thing good (managing the world’s information) in the context of ID, I see the ‘one thing’ philosophy (creating effective learning experience)..instead of doing multiple other things that might get in the way of that (things that don’t require an instructional solution).

  • http://learnometrics.blogspot.com/ Umesh Bisht

    I am pretty cool here 🙂 Still conversing.

    I agree with what you say here that a learning professional’s “one thing” is “creating effective learning experience.” It’s kind of complex (the creation I mean and involves skills that can be categorized into different “one things” – designing, writing, programming, usability etc) but yes at the end of the day for an ID its all about effective learning. Hey! Who am I teaching 🙂

    Umesh Bishts last blog post..KIPP

  • http://learnometrics.blogspot.com Umesh Bisht

    I am pretty cool here 🙂 Still conversing.

    I agree with what you say here that a learning professional’s “one thing” is “creating effective learning experience.” It’s kind of complex (the creation I mean and involves skills that can be categorized into different “one things” – designing, writing, programming, usability etc) but yes at the end of the day for an ID its all about effective learning. Hey! Who am I teaching 🙂

    Umesh Bishts last blog post..KIPP

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    It is complex isn’t it? Trying to keep it simple and focused is, I think, one of the hardest tasks to master. It’s like having that post-it note next to the computer that says, ‘what am I getting paid to do?’.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    It is complex isn’t it? Trying to keep it simple and focused is, I think, one of the hardest tasks to master. It’s like having that post-it note next to the computer that says, ‘what am I getting paid to do?’.

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