Multi-Generational Learning in the Workplace

February 26, 2009

Here are the slides from an online session I did yesterday on Multi-Generational Learning in the Workplace.  This was the first time I presented on this topic and the first time I led a session using Saba’s Centra platform. Great questions, great crowd, no big tech issues. Cammy Bean took some notes and graciously posted them on her blog. Funny it was also the first time Cammy “heard” my voice (other than in it’s written form). (From her Tweet:  listening to @jclarey She’s actually a real person! ) Cat’s out of the bag now!

I guess there were some people that couldn’t join because the registration number was exceeded so I’ll be presenting the session again in the near future and we’ll beef up the registration numbers for all of our future events. Also, we moved to a new server so you Mac folks should be able to play nicely with the platform.

I’ve promised a couple of things post-presentation, so look for them here shortly and add what I’ve missed in the comments section if you don’t see something you were interested in getting more info on:

  • Additional details on Millennial’s and critical thinking and reflecting skills (future post)
  • Bibliography (below)

In a nutshell, my main points:

  • The “younger” generation (“millennials” born in the 80s-90s) are not [automatic] masters of technology and often use a limited range of technologies (i.e., Google, Google Scholar, and Wikipedia for homework, the school’s VLE/LMS, instant message, text, profile on a social networking service like Facebook or MySpace.)
  • When the “younger” generation goes to work, their expectations are influenced more by prior educational experiences than use of technology outside an educational setting. (i.e., To learn, I sat in a classroom for years, so it would be normal to expect to sit in a classroom to learn at work. Because I watch YouTube videos, have a Facebook, and text doesn’t mean I expect you to use those to train me at work).
  • The “younger” generation does not have a high level of use of collaborative knowledge creation tools (“2.0”) and don’t adopt radically different patterns of knowledge creation and sharing.
  • Don’t ground transformation of education arguments around “younger” generations’ expectations and patterns of technology use. (Ground it in this: to address the changing nature in the way we all handle information (create it, retrieve it, interact with it), the way we communicate information, and the way we, as humans, interact with each other.)
  • As IDs we need to use educational technology to gain wisdom FROM it and we need to enhance our capabilities of our understanding so we can use it IN our learning activities.
  • Ditch the digital native / immigrant thing. It’s served its purpose – a catalyst for conversation.
  • Regardless of age, heavy tech users have similar characteristics. (I therefore label myself a “Baby Boomer/ Gen X ‘cusper’ a.k.a. “Jones Generation,” with millennial tendencies possibly caused by high exposure to technology.”  But “Janet” works too.)
  • Your exposure to technology defines how tech savvy you are, not your age.
  • While we can identify different traits of generations, we can’t – and should not – make broad brushstroke statements. There are simply too many variables (workplace culture, exposure to technology, socio-cultural differences, gender, geography, socio-ecomonic, etc.)
  • Designing instruction based on a person’s age is not grounded in solid research.
  • Keep your own bias in mind.
  • My arguments primarily revolve around the knowledge worker – those who work with information.
  • If you’re only ticket to getting resources is to ride the hype wave of “generational learning styles” then OK. (but don’t design instruction to it)
  • Know the learning theories behind your craft damn it!

I mean really saying, “Janet, you’re ‘old’ (46), you go take that self-paced e-learning course where you just click the next button. And you, Marie, 28 year-old, you go create an avatar of yourself and enter our virtual world…” WTF! Don’t do this!

References all hodgepodge and not APA because I’m not getting graded for this post:

Baird, D.E. & Fisher, M. 2005-2006. Neomillennial User Experience Design Strategies: Utilizing social networking media to support “always on” learning styles. J. Educational Technology Systems, Vol. 34 (1) 5-32, 2005-2006.

Bonwell C.C & Eison, J.A., 1991. Active Learning: Creating Excitement in the Classroom. ERIC Digest, ERIC Digests. http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/23/6e/bd.pdf

Brown, J.S. (2002). Growing Up Digital: How the Web Changes Work, Education, and the Ways People Learn. Education at a Distance. USDLA Journal. http://www.usdla.org/html/journal/FEB02_Issue/article01.html

Brown, J. S., Collins, A., & Duguid. (1989). “Situated cognition and the culture of learning.” Educational Researcher 18(1): 32-42.

Chinnery, G.M. (2008). You’ve got some GALL: Google-assisted language learning. Language Learning & Technology, February 2008, Volume 12, Number 1, pp. 3-11.

Codrington, G. (2008). Generation comparisons. ? @tomorrowtoday. Blog. http://www.tmtd.biz/2008/05/10/generation-comparisons/#more-1562

Debard, R. D. (2004). Millennials coming to college. In R. D. Debard & M. D. Coomes (Eds.). Serving the millennial generation: New directions for student services (pp. 33-45). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass in Reeves, T.C. (2006). Do Generational Differences Matter in Instructional Design? Department of Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology (EPIT).

Dede, C. (1996). Emerging Technologies and Distributed Learning. The American Journal of Distance Education.

Dede, C. (2006). Neomillennial Learning Styles: From Websites to Distributed-Learning Communities. Innovations in eLearning Symposium 2006. distance.nmsu.edu/faculty/presentations/dede01.ppt

Dede, C. (2005). Planning for Neomillennial Learning Styles. Educause Quarterly. http://connect.educause.edu/Library/EDUCAUSE+Quarterly/PlanningforNeomillennialL/39899

de Kort, L. (2004). White Paper: Generations at Work. Australian Institute of Management. http://www.aimnt.com.au/ntatwork/generations_at_work.pdf

Dzuiban, C. & Moskal, P. (2007). Assessing Student Success. Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness, University of Central Florida. http://www.educause.edu/aascu07

Dzuiban, C., Moskal, P., & Hartman, J. (2006). Higher Education, Blended Learning and the Generations: Knowledge is Power – No More. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=1&url=http%3A%2F%2Ftlc.ucalgary.ca%2Fdocuments%2Fchuck.doc&ei=0TTFSJbwNoeWec6b6fsH&usg=AFQjCNHugUwz10NMKeE7dVap5HUhNMlU1Q&sig2=FafgboQsE6OFfwZFNIaZmQ

Gee. J. P. (2003). What Video Games Have To Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Goldman-Segall, R. (1998). Points of Viewing Children’s Thinking: A Digital Ethnographer’s Journey, Erlbaum, Mahwah, New Jersey, 1998.

Henry, J. (2007). Professor pans ‘learning style’ teaching method. Telegraph. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/07/29/nteach129.xml

Howe, N., & Strauss, W. (2000). Millennials rising: The next great generation. New York: Vintage Books.

Johnson, S. (2005). Everything bad is good for you: How today’s popular culture is actually making use smarter. New York: Riverhead Books in Reeves, T.C. (2006). Do Generational Differences Matter in Instructional Design? Department of Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology (EPIT).

Jonassen, D. H., McAleese, T. M. R. & Duffy, T. M. (1993). A Manifesto for a constructivist approach to technology in higher education. In Duffy, T. M., Lowyck, J. & Jonassen, D. H. (Eds.) The design of constructivistic learning environments: Implications for instructional design and the use of technology, Heidelburg, FRG: Springer-Verlag in Moallem, M. (2001). Applying Constructivist and Objective Learning Theories in the Design of a Web-Based Course: Implications for Practice. Educational Technology & Society. http://ifets.fit.fraunhofer.de/periodical/vol_3_2001/moallem.html

Jonassen, D. (1998). Designing Constructivist Learning Environments. In C.M. Reigeluth (Ed.) Instructional theories and models. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Klopfer, E. & Squire, K. (2004). Environmental Detectives—the development of an augmented reality platform for environmental simulations. Journal of Educational Technology Research and Development, Volume 56, Number 2. Springer Boston.

Lambropoulos, N. (2005). Neomillennial eLearning Environment for Open Universities at the Age of Ubiquitous Computing. Presentation.

McLester, S. (2007). Technology Literacy and the MySpace Generation. techLEARNING from Technology & Learning. http://www.techlearning.com/showArticle.php?articleID=196604312

Moallem, M. (2001). Applying Constructivist and Objective Learning Theories in the Design of a Web-Based Course: Implications for Practice. Educational Technology & Society. http://ifets.fit.fraunhofer.de/periodical/vol_3_2001/moallem.html

Oblinger, D.G. (2007). Growing Up with Google. EDUCAUSE 2007 Conference Presentation. http://www.educause.edu/aascu07

Oblinger, D.G. (2007). The Next Generation of Courses. EDUCAUSE 2007 Conference Presentation. http://www.educause.edu/aascu07

Oblinger, D. (2003). Boomers, Gen-Xers, & Millennials: Understanding the New Students. July/August 2003. Educause review.

Oblinger, D. &Oblinger, J. (eds.) (2005). Educating the Net Generation. Educause. http://www.educause.edu/educatingthenetgen

Palfrey, J. & Gasser, Urs (2008). Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon. NCB University Press, Vol. 9 No. 5, October 2001. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=1&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.marcprensky.com%2Fwriting%2FPrensky%2520-%2520Digital%2520Natives%2C%2520Digital%2520Immigrants%2520-%2520Part1.pdf&ei=7j3FSMD_DYjkesrlvYkI&usg=AFQjCNEUHeiX8ghPYUPXKPWbM4xzAljIpg&sig2=pJTxWPUpcqm-4sMLe-K3_Q

Reeves, T.C. (2006). Do Generational Differences Matter in Instructional Design? Department of Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology (EPIT).

Reid, A. Writing in the Digital Age. Retrieved from http://mfeldstein.com/669

Slator, B. M. and Associates. (2006). Electric worlds in the classroom: Teaching and learning with role-based computer games. New York: Teachers College Press in Reeves, T.C. (2006). Do Generational Differences Matter in Instructional Design? Department of Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology (EPIT).

Suave, E. (2007). Informal Knowledge Transfer. T&D. March 2007. www.learningcircuits.org/2007/0307sauve

Twenge, J. M. (2006). Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled – and More Miserable Than Ever Before. Free Press. New York, NY. http://www.amazon.com/Generation-Americans-Confident-Assertive-Entitled/dp/0743276981/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1207665559&sr=1-1

Wilen-Daugenti, T. (2007). The 21st Century Learning Environment: Next-generation strategies for higher education. Cisco internet Business Solutions Group, Global Education.

Wilson, B. & Cole, P. (1991). A review of cognitive teaching methods. Educational Technology Research and Development. Volume 39, Number 4, Springer Boston.

Developing the Generations: Is there a difference?
HR Spring Forum, May 7, 2007 http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&ct=res&cd=1&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jobs.sc.gov%2FOHR%2F07hr-forum%2FDevelopingtheGenerations.ppt&ei=_S3FSPPgMqawevXa8IQI&usg=AFQjCNH_wGZAcwx4kMpLCzqLBgqZg3DGDw&sig2=pOJh5OLqb-xHIfZ1Hm4JRA

And, very recent publications:

Sue Bennett, Karl Maton, Lisa Kervin
The ‘digital natives’ debate: A critical review of the evidence.
British Journal of Educational Technology
Vol. 39 No. 5 2008 p. 775-776
http://www.cheeps.com/karlmaton/pdf/bjet.pdf

Anoush Margaryan and Allison Littlejohn
Are digital natives a myth or reality?: Students’ use of technologies for learning.
December 11, 2008
http://chartingthelabyrinths.wordpress.com/2008/12/11/are-digital-natives-a-myth-or-reality-students%E2%80%99-use-of-technologies-for-learning/

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  • http://pursuingperformanceblog.blogspot.com/ Guy W Wallace

    Thank you for separating the wheat from the chaff in our professional field! I’m sure that this will be a bit controversial – we each carry our own biases – and it is extremely refreshing to see solid research summarized for us lay people that swims against the tide of super-hype!

    Guy W Wallaces last blog post..One of My Favorite Germans – That I Expect to See at ISPI this April!

  • http://pursuingperformanceblog.blogspot.com/ Guy W Wallace

    Thank you for separating the wheat from the chaff in our professional field! I’m sure that this will be a bit controversial – we each carry our own biases – and it is extremely refreshing to see solid research summarized for us lay people that swims against the tide of super-hype!

    Guy W Wallaces last blog post..One of My Favorite Germans – That I Expect to See at ISPI this April!

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Thanks Guy. This is a very interesting area of study. It does go a bit against the tide! My angle was on the design of instruction – hopefully, people will see it that way and not think there are no differences among generations. Jean Twenge, for example, did a huge study that shows some real differences between the millennials and other generations. Fascinating reading. danah boyd’s work is also eye-opening. Her work is around youth and networked publics and, as a parent, it was helpful in understanding my own kids online activities. Anyway, thanks so much for your comment.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Thanks Guy. This is a very interesting area of study. It does go a bit against the tide! My angle was on the design of instruction – hopefully, people will see it that way and not think there are no differences among generations. Jean Twenge, for example, did a huge study that shows some real differences between the millennials and other generations. Fascinating reading. danah boyd’s work is also eye-opening. Her work is around youth and networked publics and, as a parent, it was helpful in understanding my own kids online activities. Anyway, thanks so much for your comment.

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  • Maria Hlas

    I love this and I know I have said this before but I can see this in the management classes we facilitate. It doesn’t matter whether attendees are older or younger, they like the subjects we teach, they listen, add comments, ask questions and love it when they get together in small groups and work on things. End of story – give the people what they want!

  • Maria Hlas

    I love this and I know I have said this before but I can see this in the management classes we facilitate. It doesn’t matter whether attendees are older or younger, they like the subjects we teach, they listen, add comments, ask questions and love it when they get together in small groups and work on things. End of story – give the people what they want!

  • http://www.daveswhiteboard.com/ Dave Ferguson

    Janet, I’ve wondered since the talk whether some misperceptions about active use–content creation–are the result of people who are relatively heavy content-creators mainly running into other content creators?

    To paraphrase a comment I wrote, some people twitter all the time, and hang out with other twitters, and the bunch of them think all swans are white.

    Further, it’s one thing to text messages; it’s another to create web pages, blog posts, your own videos, or your own music. All those things are easier to do, and more people in younger age groups are doing them — but not all in those groups.

    Dave Fergusons last blog post..

  • http://www.daveswhiteboard.com Dave Ferguson

    Janet, I’ve wondered since the talk whether some misperceptions about active use–content creation–are the result of people who are relatively heavy content-creators mainly running into other content creators?

    To paraphrase a comment I wrote, some people twitter all the time, and hang out with other twitters, and the bunch of them think all swans are white.

    Further, it’s one thing to text messages; it’s another to create web pages, blog posts, your own videos, or your own music. All those things are easier to do, and more people in younger age groups are doing them — but not all in those groups.

    Dave Fergusons last blog post..

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  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Hi Dave-
    I’m sure some misperceptions are a result of your ‘white swan’ theory. Or, it might be intentional. I hate to think that’s the case. There’s a certain naive theme with this topic. You might have your white swan group and you might have your ‘these darn kids and their technology’ group – the knee-slapping “I can’t program my own TiVo” crowd. In our line of work, both are dangerous. I guess your theme here is the “ALL or NOTHING” thinking maybe. Hmmm…

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Hi Dave-
    I’m sure some misperceptions are a result of your ‘white swan’ theory. Or, it might be intentional. I hate to think that’s the case. There’s a certain naive theme with this topic. You might have your white swan group and you might have your ‘these darn kids and their technology’ group – the knee-slapping “I can’t program my own TiVo” crowd. In our line of work, both are dangerous. I guess your theme here is the “ALL or NOTHING” thinking maybe. Hmmm…

  • http://www.flypmedia.com/issues/24/#1/1 Jon B.

    You may be interested in this article on the Millennial Generation: FLYP: Meet the Millennials.

  • http://www.flypmedia.com/issues/24/#1/1 Jon B.

    You may be interested in this article on the Millennial Generation: FLYP: Meet the Millennials.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Thanks Jon. Nice site.

    If I step outside my own Generation, I can still fit many of the trait markers of the Millennial generation. And, I’m sure many Millennials fit the trait markers of other generations. This is where I’m skeptical. And, the same conversation repeats every 10 years.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Thanks Jon. Nice site.

    If I step outside my own Generation, I can still fit many of the trait markers of the Millennial generation. And, I’m sure many Millennials fit the trait markers of other generations. This is where I’m skeptical. And, the same conversation repeats every 10 years.

  • http://newmiddle-earth.blogspot.com/ Ken Allan

    T?n? koe Janet!

    I had to read what you wrote in this post twice to believe it.

    I wholeheartedly agree with every bit of it, right down to the WTF! Good on ya!

    Catchya later
    from Middle-earth

    Ken Allans last blog post..Approximate Aims and Nebulous Targets

  • http://newmiddle-earth.blogspot.com/ Ken Allan

    T?n? koe Janet!

    I had to read what you wrote in this post twice to believe it.

    I wholeheartedly agree with every bit of it, right down to the WTF! Good on ya!

    Catchya later
    from Middle-earth

    Ken Allans last blog post..Approximate Aims and Nebulous Targets

  • http://pursuingperformanceblog.blogspot.com/ Guy W Wallace

    Here is a link to a study done for the US Army by Richard E. Clark about learning styles and multi-generational learning:
    http://thepactwiki.wikispaces.com/R.+E.+Clark+-+US+Army+Study+-+2006

    Guy W Wallaces last blog post..Writing a Better Job Description

  • http://pursuingperformanceblog.blogspot.com/ Guy W Wallace

    Here is a link to a study done for the US Army by Richard E. Clark about learning styles and multi-generational learning:
    http://thepactwiki.wikispaces.com/R.+E.+Clark+-+US+Army+Study+-+2006

    Guy W Wallaces last blog post..Writing a Better Job Description

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Thanks Guy. I look forward to reading it!

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Thanks Guy. I look forward to reading it!

  • David Wilkins

    Really good stuff in here Janet. I particularly like your ideas about ditching the distinctions between digital immigrants and natives, focusing instead on behavior and experience. I think all the new stats on FB adoption and overall social media adoption by the older demographic is proof that these digital “immigrants” will be just fine. Two related thoughts:

    1) I sometimes liken social media adoption to email and internet access in general. Once people started to see value, age or previous reluctance became irrelevant. This happened with IM in our company as well. Eventually everyone adopts when it becomes “the way work gets done.”

    2) I do think that there are differences in the way that *savvy* Millenials use and think about web 2.0 technologies. I have no evidence to back this up, but my smart, tech savvy co-workers who are in their 20’s seem to really “get” this stuff at a more fundamental level even than I do (and naturally I think I’m pretty good at this… ; ). Could be case specific, I’m not sure. I’m also not sure that it matters given all of your other really great points… : )

  • http:dwilkinsnh.wordpress.com David Wilkins

    Really good stuff in here Janet. I particularly like your ideas about ditching the distinctions between digital immigrants and natives, focusing instead on behavior and experience. I think all the new stats on FB adoption and overall social media adoption by the older demographic is proof that these digital “immigrants” will be just fine. Two related thoughts:

    1) I sometimes liken social media adoption to email and internet access in general. Once people started to see value, age or previous reluctance became irrelevant. This happened with IM in our company as well. Eventually everyone adopts when it becomes “the way work gets done.”

    2) I do think that there are differences in the way that *savvy* Millenials use and think about web 2.0 technologies. I have no evidence to back this up, but my smart, tech savvy co-workers who are in their 20’s seem to really “get” this stuff at a more fundamental level even than I do (and naturally I think I’m pretty good at this… ; ). Could be case specific, I’m not sure. I’m also not sure that it matters given all of your other really great points… : )

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Thanks Dave. I share you’re feelings on(and the lack of evidence to support) the feeling that tech-savvy ’20 somethings’ ‘get’ this more than we (i assume we may be around the same age) might. Of course I wonder if there are some 20-somethings that look at the way you work and wonder if you ‘get’ something more than they do. Something experience brings maybe? (more situations to pull from). I’m thinking schema. We might be less likely to grasp something new when we have a background that conflicts.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Thanks Dave. I share you’re feelings on(and the lack of evidence to support) the feeling that tech-savvy ’20 somethings’ ‘get’ this more than we (i assume we may be around the same age) might. Of course I wonder if there are some 20-somethings that look at the way you work and wonder if you ‘get’ something more than they do. Something experience brings maybe? (more situations to pull from). I’m thinking schema. We might be less likely to grasp something new when we have a background that conflicts.

  • http://www.karlkapp.blogspot.com/ Karl

    Janet,

    I am a little disappointed that you didn’t include “Gadgets, Games and Gizmos for Learning: Tools and Techniques for Transferring Know-How from Boomers to Gamers” as a resource or a tool.

    It might change some of your thinking and steer your thoughts in a different direction in terms of instructional design and the newer generation.
    The book talks about how to take the tools of the gamer generation and use it to deliver instruction using sound instructional design techniques.

    The newer generation of learners have one set of tools at home and in college and then use a different set at work…a worse set.

    I can tell you I see the difference in college classrooms. Other fields like advertising and TV are getting it, maybe the ID field will, once again, be the last discipline to get it. We can’t keep pushing the same junk to people and expect them to learn.

    In terms of research about effectiveness or different methods, I’ve been doing some looking for research that shows traditonal face-to-face learning is effective…there is little to show that it is…yet it becomes the default training method when we fail to believe that we, IDers, need to change our approach.
    .

    Karl

    Karls last blog post..Survey Says…

  • http://www.karlkapp.blogspot.com Karl

    Janet,

    I am a little disappointed that you didn’t include “Gadgets, Games and Gizmos for Learning: Tools and Techniques for Transferring Know-How from Boomers to Gamers” as a resource or a tool.

    It might change some of your thinking and steer your thoughts in a different direction in terms of instructional design and the newer generation.
    The book talks about how to take the tools of the gamer generation and use it to deliver instruction using sound instructional design techniques.

    The newer generation of learners have one set of tools at home and in college and then use a different set at work…a worse set.

    I can tell you I see the difference in college classrooms. Other fields like advertising and TV are getting it, maybe the ID field will, once again, be the last discipline to get it. We can’t keep pushing the same junk to people and expect them to learn.

    In terms of research about effectiveness or different methods, I’ve been doing some looking for research that shows traditonal face-to-face learning is effective…there is little to show that it is…yet it becomes the default training method when we fail to believe that we, IDers, need to change our approach.
    .

    Karl

    Karls last blog post..Survey Says…

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Hi Karl – Actually I have not yet read “Gadgets, Games and Gizmos for Learning: Tools and Techniques for Transferring Know-How from Boomers to Gamers” so that’s why you don’t see it on the reference list for this particular research report and supporting webinar. I will now though! I’m always interested thinking about instructional design differently. Re: Research on f2f vs other methods. I always end up with the same conclusion: it depends and ‘no significant difference.’ The research seems to point to METHOD making the difference. Thanks for adding to the conversation.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Hi Karl – Actually I have not yet read “Gadgets, Games and Gizmos for Learning: Tools and Techniques for Transferring Know-How from Boomers to Gamers” so that’s why you don’t see it on the reference list for this particular research report and supporting webinar. I will now though! I’m always interested thinking about instructional design differently. Re: Research on f2f vs other methods. I always end up with the same conclusion: it depends and ‘no significant difference.’ The research seems to point to METHOD making the difference. Thanks for adding to the conversation.

  • http://www.karlkapp.blogspot.com/ Karl

    Janet,

    It does depend on the instructional design. I think research would be better off focusing on the factors of media that make it effective and not comparision studies (and some of that is happening). Send me your land mail address and I’ll send you a copy of the book.

    Karl

    Karls last blog post..Survey Says…

  • http://www.karlkapp.blogspot.com Karl

    Janet,

    It does depend on the instructional design. I think research would be better off focusing on the factors of media that make it effective and not comparision studies (and some of that is happening). Send me your land mail address and I’ll send you a copy of the book.

    Karl

    Karls last blog post..Survey Says…

  • http://ignatiawebs.blogspot.com/ ignatia/Inge de Waard

    hi Janet,
    Great post! I love it, the technical/educational dichotomy solely based on age is just ridiculous.

    ignatia/Inge de Waards last blog post..Informal learning short-cut: alerts bring your interested parties closer to you

  • http://ignatiawebs.blogspot.com ignatia/Inge de Waard

    hi Janet,
    Great post! I love it, the technical/educational dichotomy solely based on age is just ridiculous.

    ignatia/Inge de Waards last blog post..Informal learning short-cut: alerts bring your interested parties closer to you

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  • margaret

    I am looking for Multi-Generational Learning in the Workplace webinar that is to be on June 3. All the things I am finding talk about the february event. Can you direct me to the registration?

  • margaret

    I am looking for Multi-Generational Learning in the Workplace webinar that is to be on June 3. All the things I am finding talk about the february event. Can you direct me to the registration?

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