I'm just saying…

January 2, 2008

I ran across I’m just saying.. on the Pain in the English blog as I was searching for the origin of another phrase. The comments about the origin of “I’m just saying…” which follow the post are interesting to read. My favorite comment is, “‘All I’m saying’ is a tool of the shit stirrer.” And all I’m saying is we’ve got a lot of those in this industry. We kick around, make up, and debate (perhaps not vehemently enough) phrases in the edusphere all the time. Some just stir but we’re all the better for it I guess (whatever that means).

What’s in a word or phrase? For me the answer to that was my greatest takeaway from a course I took last semester on learning theory. How careless I’ve been with words – philosophy vs. theory, learning theory vs. instructional theory vs. instructional strategy, and the word “outcome” which, I may not use again.

What is learning? What is Web 2.0? What words do we use to define each? What does it matter if we’re careless?

  • Maria Hlas

    Ooh – here’s a hot button for me – and thanks for the link to this site – I love it (“Try and” is one of my pet peeves). There are the latest phrases everyone is using in general business and then there are our industry-specific terms. They drive me crazy and I usually try to resist them (honest, I have never used the phrase “thinking outside the box” in a serious conversation). It seems people have no problem making verbs out of nouns with wild abandon. I am well aware that language is not a stagnant thing and as new ideas and technology come along, we will always be adding words or using existing words in a new way. But I do get concerned that we use buzzwords frequently and may not be communicating as clearly as we should be or could be. For example, another pet peeve is using the word grow when you are referring to expanding something in business – we want to grow our business, we want to grow our department. Besides the fact that I still think that if you are going to grow anything it should involve planting a garden, the phrases are vague. What’s wrong with saying you want to add a graphic artist and an e-Learning developer to your staff? It is more specific and most people would know exactly what you mean. Or maybe what you meant is that you want to expand the type of projects you want to work on or possibly get involved in training new audiences. Again, all very specific things.

    I think we can really get ourselves into trouble by using our industry-specific terms when we are talking to others outside the industry. They aren’t sure what we are talking about and may not ask for definitions for fear of looking stupid. It is so easy to fall into this habit, but if we are trying to influence people (or, god forbid, “get a seat the table” – ugh!), we need to drop the buzzwords and really talk to people.

    On the ligher side, at this time of the year there is always the Lake Superior State University 2008 List of Banished Words (http://www.lssu.edu/banished/current.php). Ouch, how many of the top ten terms on the list have any of us used lately?! Trust me, I have hosted and attended plenty of webinars! I usually try to use Web seminar or Online Seminar, but I am definitely guilty of this one. Too funny!

  • Maria Hlas

    Ooh – here’s a hot button for me – and thanks for the link to this site – I love it (“Try and” is one of my pet peeves). There are the latest phrases everyone is using in general business and then there are our industry-specific terms. They drive me crazy and I usually try to resist them (honest, I have never used the phrase “thinking outside the box” in a serious conversation). It seems people have no problem making verbs out of nouns with wild abandon. I am well aware that language is not a stagnant thing and as new ideas and technology come along, we will always be adding words or using existing words in a new way. But I do get concerned that we use buzzwords frequently and may not be communicating as clearly as we should be or could be. For example, another pet peeve is using the word grow when you are referring to expanding something in business – we want to grow our business, we want to grow our department. Besides the fact that I still think that if you are going to grow anything it should involve planting a garden, the phrases are vague. What’s wrong with saying you want to add a graphic artist and an e-Learning developer to your staff? It is more specific and most people would know exactly what you mean. Or maybe what you meant is that you want to expand the type of projects you want to work on or possibly get involved in training new audiences. Again, all very specific things.

    I think we can really get ourselves into trouble by using our industry-specific terms when we are talking to others outside the industry. They aren’t sure what we are talking about and may not ask for definitions for fear of looking stupid. It is so easy to fall into this habit, but if we are trying to influence people (or, god forbid, “get a seat the table” – ugh!), we need to drop the buzzwords and really talk to people.

    On the ligher side, at this time of the year there is always the Lake Superior State University 2008 List of Banished Words (http://www.lssu.edu/banished/current.php). Ouch, how many of the top ten terms on the list have any of us used lately?! Trust me, I have hosted and attended plenty of webinars! I usually try to use Web seminar or Online Seminar, but I am definitely guilty of this one. Too funny!

  • Maria Hlas

    Ooh – here’s a hot button for me – and thanks for the link to this site – I love it (“Try and” is one of my pet peeves). There are the latest phrases everyone is using in general business and then there are our industry-specific terms. They drive me crazy and I usually try to resist them (honest, I have never used the phrase “thinking outside the box” in a serious conversation). It seems people have no problem making verbs out of nouns with wild abandon. I am well aware that language is not a stagnant thing and as new ideas and technology come along, we will always be adding words or using existing words in a new way. But I do get concerned that we use buzzwords frequently and may not be communicating as clearly as we should be or could be. For example, another pet peeve is using the word grow when you are referring to expanding something in business – we want to grow our business, we want to grow our department. Besides the fact that I still think that if you are going to grow anything it should involve planting a garden, the phrases are vague. What’s wrong with saying you want to add a graphic artist and an e-Learning developer to your staff? It is more specific and most people would know exactly what you mean. Or maybe what you meant is that you want to expand the type of projects you want to work on or possibly get involved in training new audiences. Again, all very specific things.

    I think we can really get ourselves into trouble by using our industry-specific terms when we are talking to others outside the industry. They aren’t sure what we are talking about and may not ask for definitions for fear of looking stupid. It is so easy to fall into this habit, but if we are trying to influence people (or, god forbid, “get a seat the table” – ugh!), we need to drop the buzzwords and really talk to people.

    On the ligher side, at this time of the year there is always the Lake Superior State University 2008 List of Banished Words (http://www.lssu.edu/banished/current.php). Ouch, how many of the top ten terms on the list have any of us used lately?! Trust me, I have hosted and attended plenty of webinars! I usually try to use Web seminar or Online Seminar, but I am definitely guilty of this one. Too funny!

  • Gary Woodill

    My thought on reading your post and Maria’s comment is that we mostly communicate by metaphor, and most of those are based on early childhood bodily functions. I’m just saying that we like words like shit and suck because we get them and their power is in the fact that we were told not to use them. Creativity is making up new metaphors, and innovation is changing metaphors.

  • Gary Woodill

    My thought on reading your post and Maria’s comment is that we mostly communicate by metaphor, and most of those are based on early childhood bodily functions. I’m just saying that we like words like shit and suck because we get them and their power is in the fact that we were told not to use them. Creativity is making up new metaphors, and innovation is changing metaphors.

  • Gary Woodill

    My thought on reading your post and Maria’s comment is that we mostly communicate by metaphor, and most of those are based on early childhood bodily functions. I’m just saying that we like words like shit and suck because we get them and their power is in the fact that we were told not to use them. Creativity is making up new metaphors, and innovation is changing metaphors.

  • http://www.daveswhiteboard.com/ Dave Ferguson

    A highlight of jargon-speak for me was at the first web-based learning seminar I attended. The presenter used the phrase repurposing legacy content, with a straight face.

    It took me a minute to realize he meant “reusing old stuff.”

    I’ve also noticed that many corporations are stuffed to the hierarchical gills with leaders — except when you need to get a signature on something. Then, they want a manager.

  • http://www.daveswhiteboard.com/ Dave Ferguson

    A highlight of jargon-speak for me was at the first web-based learning seminar I attended. The presenter used the phrase repurposing legacy content, with a straight face.

    It took me a minute to realize he meant “reusing old stuff.”

    I’ve also noticed that many corporations are stuffed to the hierarchical gills with leaders — except when you need to get a signature on something. Then, they want a manager.

  • http://www.daveswhiteboard.com Dave Ferguson

    A highlight of jargon-speak for me was at the first web-based learning seminar I attended. The presenter used the phrase repurposing legacy content, with a straight face.

    It took me a minute to realize he meant “reusing old stuff.”

    I’ve also noticed that many corporations are stuffed to the hierarchical gills with leaders — except when you need to get a signature on something. Then, they want a manager.

  • Maria Hlas

    Dave, your comments are too funny and they reminded me of a handy Web site – Web Economy Bulls**t Generator. It has a column of verbs, nouns, and adjectives and when you click the button it randomly picks one of each and makes a buzzword phrase. I think that speaker might have picked up repurposing legacy content from this site! Be aware that corporate firewalls may block the site (http://dack.com/web/bullshit.html) It is pretty funny, but kind of sad too.

  • Maria Hlas

    Dave, your comments are too funny and they reminded me of a handy Web site – Web Economy Bulls**t Generator. It has a column of verbs, nouns, and adjectives and when you click the button it randomly picks one of each and makes a buzzword phrase. I think that speaker might have picked up repurposing legacy content from this site! Be aware that corporate firewalls may block the site (http://dack.com/web/bullshit.html) It is pretty funny, but kind of sad too.

  • Maria Hlas

    Dave, your comments are too funny and they reminded me of a handy Web site – Web Economy Bulls**t Generator. It has a column of verbs, nouns, and adjectives and when you click the button it randomly picks one of each and makes a buzzword phrase. I think that speaker might have picked up repurposing legacy content from this site! Be aware that corporate firewalls may block the site (http://dack.com/web/bullshit.html) It is pretty funny, but kind of sad too.

  • Michael Maier

    Good question. What are words worth?
    =)

  • Michael Maier

    Good question. What are words worth?
    =)

  • Michael Maier

    Good question. What are words worth?
    =)

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Maria-
    You might like the Corporate Bullshit Dictionary. Occasionally, during a particularly draining week, I’d share one with the group I worked with. Today’s may sound familiar:

    incompetence 1. complete inability to accomplish even the simplest of tasks 2. oddly and apparently, one of the keys to achieving success in a corporate environment; those who exhibit extreme incompetence will inevitably supervise vast amounts of people, large departments and will be extraordinarily well-compensated for doing so; in the process they will make everyone who works for them crazy and extremely harried, as the staff will constantly be cleaning up the messes their incompetent bosses have created.

    Seriously, I’m guilty of using both the ‘tribal language’ of the training world and corporate B.S jargon. The latter I imagine I used in an attempt fit in (or, as Gary suggests – early childhood bodily functions) and the former to make meaning of a particular idea.
    This is a digression…but using ‘air quotes’around tribal language made me think of a Chris Farley skit on Saturday Night Live.

    Maybe I’m not “the norm.” I’m not “camera friendly.” I don’t “wear clothes that fit me.” I’m not a “heartbreaker.” I haven’t “had sex with a woman;” I don’t know “how that works.” I guess I don’t “fall in line.” I’m not “hygenic.” I don’t “wipe properly.” I lack “style.” I have no “charisma” or “self esteem.” I don’t “own a toothbrush” or “let my scabs heal.” I can’t “reach all the parts of my body.” When I sleep, I “sweat profusely.”

    Perhaps people can cure their buzzword problem by thinking in terms of Chris Farley. Perhaps 2008 will be a year to resolve not to say anything that may need “air quotes.”
    My favorite from your list of banished words… IT IS WHAT IT IS.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Maria-
    You might like the Corporate Bullshit Dictionary. Occasionally, during a particularly draining week, I’d share one with the group I worked with. Today’s may sound familiar:

    incompetence 1. complete inability to accomplish even the simplest of tasks 2. oddly and apparently, one of the keys to achieving success in a corporate environment; those who exhibit extreme incompetence will inevitably supervise vast amounts of people, large departments and will be extraordinarily well-compensated for doing so; in the process they will make everyone who works for them crazy and extremely harried, as the staff will constantly be cleaning up the messes their incompetent bosses have created.

    Seriously, I’m guilty of using both the ‘tribal language’ of the training world and corporate B.S jargon. The latter I imagine I used in an attempt fit in (or, as Gary suggests – early childhood bodily functions) and the former to make meaning of a particular idea.
    This is a digression…but using ‘air quotes’around tribal language made me think of a Chris Farley skit on Saturday Night Live.

    Maybe I’m not “the norm.” I’m not “camera friendly.” I don’t “wear clothes that fit me.” I’m not a “heartbreaker.” I haven’t “had sex with a woman;” I don’t know “how that works.” I guess I don’t “fall in line.” I’m not “hygenic.” I don’t “wipe properly.” I lack “style.” I have no “charisma” or “self esteem.” I don’t “own a toothbrush” or “let my scabs heal.” I can’t “reach all the parts of my body.” When I sleep, I “sweat profusely.”

    Perhaps people can cure their buzzword problem by thinking in terms of Chris Farley. Perhaps 2008 will be a year to resolve not to say anything that may need “air quotes.”
    My favorite from your list of banished words… IT IS WHAT IT IS.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Maria-
    You might like the Corporate Bullshit Dictionary. Occasionally, during a particularly draining week, I’d share one with the group I worked with. Today’s may sound familiar:

    incompetence 1. complete inability to accomplish even the simplest of tasks 2. oddly and apparently, one of the keys to achieving success in a corporate environment; those who exhibit extreme incompetence will inevitably supervise vast amounts of people, large departments and will be extraordinarily well-compensated for doing so; in the process they will make everyone who works for them crazy and extremely harried, as the staff will constantly be cleaning up the messes their incompetent bosses have created.

    Seriously, I’m guilty of using both the ‘tribal language’ of the training world and corporate B.S jargon. The latter I imagine I used in an attempt fit in (or, as Gary suggests – early childhood bodily functions) and the former to make meaning of a particular idea.

    This is a digression…but using ‘air quotes’around tribal language made me think of a Chris Farley skit on Saturday Night Live.

    Maybe I’m not “the norm.” I’m not “camera friendly.” I don’t “wear clothes that fit me.” I’m not a “heartbreaker.” I haven’t “had sex with a woman;” I don’t know “how that works.” I guess I don’t “fall in line.” I’m not “hygenic.” I don’t “wipe properly.” I lack “style.” I have no “charisma” or “self esteem.” I don’t “own a toothbrush” or “let my scabs heal.” I can’t “reach all the parts of my body.” When I sleep, I “sweat profusely.”

    Perhaps people can cure their buzzword problem by thinking in terms of Chris Farley. Perhaps 2008 will be a year to resolve not to say anything that may need “air quotes.”

    My favorite from your list of banished words… IT IS WHAT IT IS.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Gary:

    Re: Your comment “Creativity is making up new metaphors, and innovation is changing metaphors.”

    Aren’t we just talking about market differentiation? Securing a niche through the making of a new metaphor? Perhaps making money from what’s old? “Look at the new Janet, now with sexy legs! (as if)”

    Re your comment: “I’m just saying that we like words like shit and suck because we get them and their power is in the fact that we were told not to use them.”

    I guess it’s back to therapy for me ; ) to cure that rebellious streak. You will know I’m cured when I stop tagging things “WTF.”

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Gary:

    Re: Your comment “Creativity is making up new metaphors, and innovation is changing metaphors.”

    Aren’t we just talking about market differentiation? Securing a niche through the making of a new metaphor? Perhaps making money from what’s old? “Look at the new Janet, now with sexy legs! (as if)”

    Re your comment: “I’m just saying that we like words like shit and suck because we get them and their power is in the fact that we were told not to use them.”

    I guess it’s back to therapy for me ; ) to cure that rebellious streak. You will know I’m cured when I stop tagging things “WTF.”

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Gary:

    Re: Your comment “Creativity is making up new metaphors, and innovation is changing metaphors.”

    Aren’t we just talking about market differentiation? Securing a niche through the making of a new metaphor? Perhaps making money from what’s old? “Look at the new Janet, now with sexy legs! (as if)”

    Re your comment: “I’m just saying that we like words like shit and suck because we get them and their power is in the fact that we were told not to use them.”

    I guess it’s back to therapy for me ; ) to cure that rebellious streak. You will know I’m cured when I stop tagging things “WTF.”

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Loved the Tom Tom Club Michael. Thanks. I think I’ll put on some Talking Heads today.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Loved the Tom Tom Club Michael. Thanks. I think I’ll put on some Talking Heads today.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Loved the Tom Tom Club Michael. Thanks. I think I’ll put on some Talking Heads today.

  • Gary Woodill

    While doing my morning bodily chores this morning I asked myself the question – “So what is the problem with buzzwords and phrases?” Why is using “I’m just saying that…” an issue?

    A two part answer:

    “I’m just saying that…” is a boundary metaphor. The word “just” delimits what you are saying from what you are not saying, and boundaries are something physical we learn early on. So the phrase is being used to denote precision in the user’s communication.

    But the phrase is not used universally by all social classes and subcultures, so it also becomes a marker of who you are (and who you aren’t). I think that the problem with buzzwords and phrases is that they are tribal markers – telling people that you are in a group because you use the lingo of that group, and this can irritate people who are not in the group (but who would like to be).

    My wife Karen often objects to phrases that I have picked up from working in the corporate world. My theory is that they remind her that she is not in my world 24/7, and wanting complete control of me (as all wives do), this irritates her. On the other hand, she is in the academic world, which has its own set of cliches and metaphors. But, as a recovering academic, I don’t want to be in her work world.

    Buzzwords are shortcuts that tell people what team you are on…

    Why is this a problem?

  • Gary Woodill

    While doing my morning bodily chores this morning I asked myself the question – “So what is the problem with buzzwords and phrases?” Why is using “I’m just saying that…” an issue?

    A two part answer:

    “I’m just saying that…” is a boundary metaphor. The word “just” delimits what you are saying from what you are not saying, and boundaries are something physical we learn early on. So the phrase is being used to denote precision in the user’s communication.

    But the phrase is not used universally by all social classes and subcultures, so it also becomes a marker of who you are (and who you aren’t). I think that the problem with buzzwords and phrases is that they are tribal markers – telling people that you are in a group because you use the lingo of that group, and this can irritate people who are not in the group (but who would like to be).

    My wife Karen often objects to phrases that I have picked up from working in the corporate world. My theory is that they remind her that she is not in my world 24/7, and wanting complete control of me (as all wives do), this irritates her. On the other hand, she is in the academic world, which has its own set of cliches and metaphors. But, as a recovering academic, I don’t want to be in her work world.

    Buzzwords are shortcuts that tell people what team you are on…

    Why is this a problem?

  • Gary Woodill

    While doing my morning bodily chores this morning I asked myself the question – “So what is the problem with buzzwords and phrases?” Why is using “I’m just saying that…” an issue?

    A two part answer:

    “I’m just saying that…” is a boundary metaphor. The word “just” delimits what you are saying from what you are not saying, and boundaries are something physical we learn early on. So the phrase is being used to denote precision in the user’s communication.

    But the phrase is not used universally by all social classes and subcultures, so it also becomes a marker of who you are (and who you aren’t). I think that the problem with buzzwords and phrases is that they are tribal markers – telling people that you are in a group because you use the lingo of that group, and this can irritate people who are not in the group (but who would like to be).

    My wife Karen often objects to phrases that I have picked up from working in the corporate world. My theory is that they remind her that she is not in my world 24/7, and wanting complete control of me (as all wives do), this irritates her. On the other hand, she is in the academic world, which has its own set of cliches and metaphors. But, as a recovering academic, I don’t want to be in her work world.

    Buzzwords are shortcuts that tell people what team you are on…

    Why is this a problem?

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    I’ll have to chew on that a bit Gary as I complete my bodily chores throughout the day…

    First thought though is that we can’t control the buzzwords that come out of people’s mouths, just our reaction to them. So, they are a problem for those that see them as BS, not so much for those that see them as a way to be precise.

    I don’t see the problem (if viewed as a problem) as a control issue although my theory is that many men like the control that marriage tends to bring. At least that’s what I tell my husband.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    I’ll have to chew on that a bit Gary as I complete my bodily chores throughout the day…

    First thought though is that we can’t control the buzzwords that come out of people’s mouths, just our reaction to them. So, they are a problem for those that see them as BS, not so much for those that see them as a way to be precise.

    I don’t see the problem (if viewed as a problem) as a control issue although my theory is that many men like the control that marriage tends to bring. At least that’s what I tell my husband.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    I’ll have to chew on that a bit Gary as I complete my bodily chores throughout the day…

    First thought though is that we can’t control the buzzwords that come out of people’s mouths, just our reaction to them. So, they are a problem for those that see them as BS, not so much for those that see them as a way to be precise.

    I don’t see the problem (if viewed as a problem) as a control issue although my theory is that many men like the control that marriage tends to bring. At least that’s what I tell my husband.

  • Maria Hlas

    I don’t want to paint all buzzwords or lingo as problems, because as Gary says there is something to belonging to a tribe and having the ease of using shortcuts. If I have a negative reaction to a particular word (frequently evidenced as a pain behind my right eye) then that is my problem to deal with. However, there are some people who choose to communicate with a whole bunch of corporate speak strung together in a long discourse of nothingness. When you drop the pretense and really talk to someone, the occasional lingo or buzzword rolls right off of you and you barely notice it. So maybe the problem is when people use these words to keep others at a distance and not really say what they mean.

    The idea of phrases and lingo for different classes, different parts of the country, etc. is interesting. I had a phone interview with a recruiter from out west and she used the phrase “and what not” at the end of sentences like some people would use “you know” or “you know what I mean.” I thought it was just her until I talked to a second person from the company and she did the same thing. Once I got used to it, I didn’t notice it, but it made me think about what little “frequent phrases” I use in conversation. And there is nothing like talking in front of a group of people to suddenly become keenly aware of your conversational habits (like ending a sentence with “and” – I am sure some psychologist would have a field day with me and that word!).

    I would just like to state for the record that, happily, I have no control issues since my husband just does what I say because it’s easier …

  • Maria Hlas

    I don’t want to paint all buzzwords or lingo as problems, because as Gary says there is something to belonging to a tribe and having the ease of using shortcuts. If I have a negative reaction to a particular word (frequently evidenced as a pain behind my right eye) then that is my problem to deal with. However, there are some people who choose to communicate with a whole bunch of corporate speak strung together in a long discourse of nothingness. When you drop the pretense and really talk to someone, the occasional lingo or buzzword rolls right off of you and you barely notice it. So maybe the problem is when people use these words to keep others at a distance and not really say what they mean.

    The idea of phrases and lingo for different classes, different parts of the country, etc. is interesting. I had a phone interview with a recruiter from out west and she used the phrase “and what not” at the end of sentences like some people would use “you know” or “you know what I mean.” I thought it was just her until I talked to a second person from the company and she did the same thing. Once I got used to it, I didn’t notice it, but it made me think about what little “frequent phrases” I use in conversation. And there is nothing like talking in front of a group of people to suddenly become keenly aware of your conversational habits (like ending a sentence with “and” – I am sure some psychologist would have a field day with me and that word!).

    I would just like to state for the record that, happily, I have no control issues since my husband just does what I say because it’s easier …

  • Maria Hlas

    I don’t want to paint all buzzwords or lingo as problems, because as Gary says there is something to belonging to a tribe and having the ease of using shortcuts. If I have a negative reaction to a particular word (frequently evidenced as a pain behind my right eye) then that is my problem to deal with. However, there are some people who choose to communicate with a whole bunch of corporate speak strung together in a long discourse of nothingness. When you drop the pretense and really talk to someone, the occasional lingo or buzzword rolls right off of you and you barely notice it. So maybe the problem is when people use these words to keep others at a distance and not really say what they mean.

    The idea of phrases and lingo for different classes, different parts of the country, etc. is interesting. I had a phone interview with a recruiter from out west and she used the phrase “and what not” at the end of sentences like some people would use “you know” or “you know what I mean.” I thought it was just her until I talked to a second person from the company and she did the same thing. Once I got used to it, I didn’t notice it, but it made me think about what little “frequent phrases” I use in conversation. And there is nothing like talking in front of a group of people to suddenly become keenly aware of your conversational habits (like ending a sentence with “and” – I am sure some psychologist would have a field day with me and that word!).

    I would just like to state for the record that, happily, I have no control issues since my husband just does what I say because it’s easier …

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    So true Maria. I agree. It’s the senseless babble that gives buzzwords a bad name.
    Your pain in the right eye is my left eye twitch. That’s all I’m saying. : )

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    So true Maria. I agree. It’s the senseless babble that gives buzzwords a bad name.
    Your pain in the right eye is my left eye twitch. That’s all I’m saying. : )

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    So true Maria. I agree. It’s the senseless babble that gives buzzwords a bad name.
    Your pain in the right eye is my left eye twitch. That’s all I’m saying. : )

  • http://wendell-communitylit.blogspot.com/ Wendell Dryden

    Are buzz words short cuts or easy ways out?

    When I hear the phrase “I’m just saying” I wonder about the subtext. “I’m not saying Canadians are incompetent or uneducated: I’m just saying I don’t think we should hire one because they’re… um… not up to it.”

    The “bloggosphere” (wait! is that a banned word? I can’t keep up) awash with people’s writings, and I love drifting about in it. But whether I return to a blog has everything to do with how many buzzwords I see on that first visit. The more concrete (and old fashioned) language I read, the more likely I am to return.

  • http://wendell-communitylit.blogspot.com/ Wendell Dryden

    Are buzz words short cuts or easy ways out?

    When I hear the phrase “I’m just saying” I wonder about the subtext. “I’m not saying Canadians are incompetent or uneducated: I’m just saying I don’t think we should hire one because they’re… um… not up to it.”

    The “bloggosphere” (wait! is that a banned word? I can’t keep up) awash with people’s writings, and I love drifting about in it. But whether I return to a blog has everything to do with how many buzzwords I see on that first visit. The more concrete (and old fashioned) language I read, the more likely I am to return.

  • http://wendell-communitylit.blogspot.com Wendell

    Are buzz words short cuts or easy ways out?

    When I hear the phrase “I’m just saying” I wonder about the subtext. “I’m not saying Canadians are incompetent or uneducated: I’m just saying I don’t think we should hire one because they’re… um… not up to it.”

    The “bloggosphere” (wait! is that a banned word? I can’t keep up) awash with people’s writings, and I love drifting about in it. But whether I return to a blog has everything to do with how many buzzwords I see on that first visit. The more concrete (and old fashioned) language I read, the more likely I am to return.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Wendell, I feel the same way. I like ‘plain English’ over buzzwords but am okay with new terms because they help me define and build upon them. If everything was just ‘learning,’ for example, I don’t think it’d be as easy to follow conversations about such things as PLEs (personal learning environments)and e-learning 2.0 (how people are incorporating user-generated content into education – if at all). I guess it bothers me when its blather. That’s subjective though.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com/ Janet Clarey

    Wendell, I feel the same way. I like ‘plain English’ over buzzwords but am okay with new terms because they help me define and build upon them. If everything was just ‘learning,’ for example, I don’t think it’d be as easy to follow conversations about such things as PLEs (personal learning environments)and e-learning 2.0 (how people are incorporating user-generated content into education – if at all). I guess it bothers me when its blather. That’s subjective though.

  • http://www.brandon-hall.com Janet Clarey

    Wendell, I feel the same way. I like ‘plain English’ over buzzwords but am okay with new terms because they help me define and build upon them. If everything was just ‘learning,’ for example, I don’t think it’d be as easy to follow conversations about such things as PLEs (personal learning environments)and e-learning 2.0 (how people are incorporating user-generated content into education – if at all). I guess it bothers me when its blather. That’s subjective though.

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