Yesterday marked ten years of Twitter. In 2006 Jack Dorsey, an undergrad at NYU, published the first message. It was twttr then:

Last week, Jane Hart posted a list of 50+ people who tweet about workplace learning. I’ve mashed that list up with the first tweets of the top 20 of them (in order of number of followers as of 3/12/16). What was your first tweet? Add it to the comments. 

Josh BERSIN @Josh_BersinHR and Learning Analyst (US)

josh

Steve WHEELER @timbuckteethAssociate Professor at Plymouth University (UK)

timb

Jane HART @C4LPTFounder, Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (UK)

jane

Jeanne MEISTER @jcmeisterAuthor of The 2020 Workplace (US)

jeanne

Gautam GHOSH @gautamghoshInterested in how social technology impacts work (India)

gautam

Marcia CONNER @marciamarciaContributor to FastCompany (US)

marcia

Jane BOZARTH @JaneBozarthAuthor of Show Your Work and more (US)

janeb

Roger FRANCIS @RogerFrancis1Director at Creative Learning Partners (UK)

roger

Harold JARCHE @hjarcheChampion of Personal Knowledge Mastery (Canada)

harold

Abhijit BHADURI @AbhijitBhaduriChief Learning Officer of Wipro (India)

ab

Clark QUINN @QuinnovatorHelping organizations use learning technology strategically (US)

clark

Luis SUAREZ @elsuaWirearchist and Chief Emergineer (Spain)

luis

Brent SCHLENKER @bschlenkerChief Learning Officer of Litmos (US)

brent

Euan SEMPLE @euanAuthor of Organizations Don’t Tweet People Do UK)

euan

Cathy MOORE @CatMooreCreator of the action mapping process for designing training (US)

cat

Janet CLAREY @jclareyManager in L&D Research @Bersin by Deloitte (US)

janet

Cammy BEAN @cammybeanVP of Learning Design at Kineo (US)

cammy

Connie MALAMED @elearningcoachProfessional Explainer (US)

connie

Donald H TAYLOR @DonaldHTaylorChairs LPI, LSG and Learning Technologies (UK)

don

Charles JENNINGS @charlesjenningsAuthor of 70:20:10 Towards 100% Performance (UK)

charles

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Machine Learning

March 6, 2016

I was recently asked a question by a colleague about machine learning and I couldn’t answer it. So of course, I went looking…first, the definition:

“Machine learning: The ability of computer systems to improve their performance by exposure to data without the need to follow explicitly programmed instructions.”

A recent paper, “Cognitive technologies in the technology sector: From science fiction vision to real-world value” published by Deloitte University Press reports there have been 100 mergers and acquisitions (M&A) within the technology sector involving cognitive technology companies, products, and services since 2012. Yowsa.

Other interesting articles on this topic:

This AI Algorithm Learns Simple Tasks as Fast as We Do

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This standing up while working rocks. Seriously. You must try it.

I wrote about the sit-to-stand desk I bought in December. I read that it was healthier than sitting and as a bonus, Deloitte has a cost-sharing wellness subsidy that would cover half the cost. Deloitte also rocks.

So what have the past three months of work have been like standing up at work?

  • I’m pretty sure I sound more engaged on calls when I’m standing. I know feel more engaged and focused.
  • I seem to able to stay focused on one thing for a longer period of time.
  • I’m keeping weight off despite a decrease in activity that often coincides with winter in upstate NY (for me anyway).

More reading on sit-stand desks:

The impact of sit-stand office workstations on worker discomfort and productivity: A review. This is a small meta-analysis that concluded sit-stand workstations are (1) likely effective in reducing perceived discomfort (vs. prolonged seated work) and (2) do not cause a decrease in productivity.

Too Much Sitting: The Population-Health Science of Sedentary Behavior. Basically, sitting time, TV time, and time sitting in automobiles may increase premature mortality risk (although further research is needed).

Health benefits of standing desks: separating hype from reality. There are a lot of great links within this article including correct posture.

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Some worthwhile reading

February 23, 2016

What a relief. “The ‘digital native’ is a ridiculous metaphor.” I feel vindicated! In four provocations, anthropologist Donna Lanclos argues that the notion of the “digital native” is bogus and disempowering, that pandering to student expectations can backfire, universities should be open by default, and our attitude to educational technology needs a rethink. The death of the digital […]

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If you let the robot drive, it may take the most rational route. What fun is that?

January 22, 2016

I met my husband in the early 80s. He had a 1970-something Chevy Nova SS. I’m not that great with car model years. It was drab green but I went out with him anyway. I had a Chevy Malibu that apparently had a combination of 1973 and 1975 parts so it was alway a bit […]

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Some great stuff that wonderfully distracted me this week

January 15, 2016

Ought and Is by Stephen Downes. A nice reminder to be sensitive of inferences involving is and ought. “If wishes were horses,” goes the old saying, “then beggars could ride.” There’s wisdom in that. Certainly we may believe things ought to be one way or another. But this belief doesn’t mean that anything actually is one […]

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What will L&D need the most help with to be successful over the next 10 years?

December 28, 2015

I recently had to answer a question for a presentation: “What will L&D need the most help with to be successful over the next 10 years?” I came up with six areas: L&D needs to get “unstuck.” There are many, many smart L&D people who (I think) know the way they’re working today isn’t going […]

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Opinion: L&D is in deep doo doo.

December 13, 2015

Serious trouble. Difficulty. Deep doo doo. Why do I think this? Here’s just a sampling. This: The next shooting is happening soon. This online course isn’t helping. The Washington Post, by Dan Zak. December 3, 2015. Quote>>>”Mass shootings, in the parlance of Human Resources. Part of work. Part of life. America, 2015.” – Dan Zak A reporter […]

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Welcome and welcome back! Returning to Bersin by Deloitte.

December 12, 2015

I’m thrilled to return to Bersin by Deloitte after a nearly three-year stint at The eLearning Guild. It sure feels nice (and unexpectedly cathartic) to see those “Welcome back!” messages. I’ll be working alongside great minds like Dani Johnson and David Mallon writing about and conducting research in enterprise learning. Deloitte is an amazing company to work for. […]

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Ounces matter: Mashing up business travel and minimalist camping

December 9, 2015

In 2015, I traveled roughly ten weeks for work and went on some solo backpacking camping trips for pleasure and sanity. Backpacking alone was new to me and it really turned me on to minimalist camping where ounces matter. I missed having my husband/manservant lugging all the big, heavy stuff about 3 miles into my […]

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New ways to consume and apply research

December 30, 2014

I’ve recently been given the opportunity to oversee The eLearning Guild’s research function, while continuing to oversee the Guild Academy, an opportunity I’m both grateful for and extremely excited about. In the past, as an analyst and industry researcher, I’ve generally followed the hourglass structure for conducting research; however, I’ve been uninspired by the lowest part of the hourglass – the output for […]

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So you’re offering me the opportunity to pay you 50% more to get back a feature I just lost?

August 15, 2014

Yes, that’s what Bloomfire wants me to do. Apparently I’ve got two weeks make up my mind. If I don’t it looks like my rate may triple. Yup. Triple. I do not feel like a customer right now even though the company I work for pays them several thousand dollars each year. Let me back up… Bloomfire is a knowledge […]

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